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Posts Tagged ‘Willow Beauty’

Actually, a couple of evenings; the pickings are too lean to justify frenetic blogging each morning. But last night, though the numbers were not high I had a disproportionate number of new species. They were all rather small though mostly classified as macro moths and it has taken me a while to get to the point where most are identified and I can post them. None are particularly notable beyond being new for me.

Unidentified micro

Unidentified micro

Second unidentifed micro

Second unidentifed micro

The second moth (above)  was substantially larger than the first – and I’m almost certain is the same species seen in the bathroom mid-July.

The third of the three unidentified micros last night was the smallest and also the most distinctive looking, with its white head; but as is so often the case with these very small moths the resources available to me simply are not comprehensive enough.

Third unidentified micro

Third unidentified micro

The remainder of the moths last night were all much larger though the first of these is classified as a micromoth.

Garden Pebble (evergestis forficalis)

Garden Pebble (evergestis forficalis)

The Garden Pebble might be a common moth in the UK but this is the first time I’ve caught one in the bathroom.

Inevitably there were pugs, to have me pulling my hair out, though one of them, this one, I was able to identify with some certainty as the Double-striped:

Double-striped Pug (glymnoscelis rufifasciata)

Double-striped Pug (glymnoscelis rufifasciata)

Another three moths that were all new to me, all common enough and all macro moths (though only the first is actually quite large):

Common Carpet (epirrhoe alternata)

Common Carpet (epirrhoe alternata)

Cloaked Minor (mesoligia furuncula)

Cloaked Minor (mesoligia furuncula)

Vine's Rustic (hoplodrina ambigua)

Vine's Rustic (hoplodrina ambigua)

And then there were two unidentified macro moths, the first a pug – the constant source of ID frustration, the other of uncertain family:

Unidentified pug

Unidentified pug

Unidentified macro (family uncertain)

Unidentified macro (family uncertain)

So that wraps up last night’s finds; it was a warmer evening and quite still – a large number of species but not present in quantities.

On the previous night, with similar conditions, pickings were far leaner but there was this lovely little macro moth which I haven’t identified, which quite happily sat on my finger (after I’d rescued it from some cobwebs) while I photographed it:

Unidentified

Unidentified

Unidentified

Unidentified

I found the first example of the micro moth pyrausta purpuralis, a moth which has been a frequent visitor in the past:

pyrausta purpuralis

pyrausta purpuralis

And then those determined Light Brown Apple Moths – a pair that was at it for ages and even tried flying while hooked up:

Light Brown Apple Moths

Light Brown Apple Moths

Worth noting also that the Willow Beauty continues to be about in numbers and that a Cabbage Moth (big and dark, rather than the white butterfly that back home is also known as the cabbage moth) were about. I couldn’t justify more posts of the Willow Beauty and couldn’t get a good shot of the cabbage moth. Off now to check out what waits upstairs.

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Last night was quieter, but the bathroom moth trap has been setting an unanticipated and unprecedented standard in terms of both quantity and quality over most of the past week.

I’ve posted on the ones that I photographed and don’t expect to ID as well as those I’m hesitant about in the two preceding posts. This last catch up post features the moths I’ve been able to ID. Some have established themselves as regular visitors this year, others are returns from previous years. Happily though the list of visitors has now significantly expanded with some new species and new variants. Here they are:

Carcina quercana

Carcina quercana

This is a lovely moth from the family Oecophoridae which are as a group among the most colourful of those classed as micro moths. About half the world’s species are found in Australia; this one is normally on the wing in July and August and typically frequents woodland though I’ve seen it before in the strawberry patch. This one was in the bathroom a couple of nights ago and stayed until the previous evening but is now gone.

 The Least Carpet  (idaea rusticata atrosignaria) isn’t scarce but is found predominantly in the south-east of England from here around to Dorset and on the wing from June to August. The larvae feed on Ivy and Traveller’s Joy. This is the first I’ve seen and noted in the bathroom, it is prettier than the more common Garden Carpet.

Least Carpet (idaea rusticata atrosignaria)

Least Carpet (idaea rusticata atrosignaria)

Phylctaenia coronata is a regular visitor. It is associated with Elder both as a moth and in its larval form. It is on the wing through June and July.

Phylctaenia coronata

Phylctaenia coronata

The Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata) is one of the most eye catching moths to turn up in the bathroom; big and bright and distinctive. This is the first one I’ve seen in the bathroom. It is a common moth and will be on the wing through now until August. It isn’t particular in terms of plants. It has a wingspan in the order of 50mm but isn’t as heavy bodied as some, so it wasn’t such an overpowering presence, and quite lovely to look at when at rest. This particular one stayed overnight and until the following evening.  

Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata)

Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata)

The Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata) has been in any number of times this year; it has a shorter season, being on the wing in June and July. It is specifically associated with Common Nettle.

Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata)

Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata)

The Orange Moth (angerona prunaria) has been to the Bathroom light in previous years – it is the moth in the header photograph.  But it has two quite different forms. The one I used in the header is orange with a bit of brown bordering and light flecking across the wings. The moth that came into the bathroom was huge – certainly at least the 50mm guideline.

Orange Moth (angerona prunaria)

Orange Moth (angerona prunaria)

The Bee Moth (aphomia sociella) is a new one this year and made a second appearance. It is a threat to honeycomb and therefore not entirely to be welcomed. It is on the wing between June and August.

Bee Moth (aphomia sociella)

Bee Moth (aphomia sociella)

The Common Emerald (hemithea aestivaria) has been in the bathroom in past years but this year is appearing in far greater numbers. It also seems to be appearing in two forms: one deep emerald the other very washed out. They are in effect the same size and in no way resemble any of the other ’emerald’ moths.

Udea olivalis

Udea olivalis

Udea olivalis is a common moth and on the wing in June and July. It has been in the house before this year, and I’ve spotted it in previous years. It is a pyralid, therefore a micro moth, found through out Britain and in its larval form dines on a variety of plants.

Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhomboidaria)

Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhomboidaria)

The Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhombaoidaria), on the wing between June and October though in two generations, is common and widespread. Like a lot of the moths that come to the bathroom the food plants include Ivy.

 And also…

Of course last night there would be more small moths I’m unsure of. The larger moth on the left in this photo is a Small Dusty Wave. The point of the pic. is the smaller moth on the right – I took several pictures but this is the one that shows its markings most clearly.

Small Dusty Wave and unidentified micro moth

Small Dusty Wave and unidentified micro moth

And then there was this moth. Its highly reflective scales meant I could not get a particularly good picture of it. For what it is worth:

Unidentified micro moth

Unidentified micro moth

And with that I have caught up on the moth trap and it remains only to sift through the photographs taken on my walk this afternoon.

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