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Posts Tagged ‘phylctaenia coronata’

Last night was quiet again, even quieter than the previous night though with an almost completely new cast of characters.

A Dark Arches again lurked, in almost the same place. Had it not been for the moth’s absence during the day (oh, and the lack of any damage to the trailing edge) I might have thought it the same specimen. But a Small Magpie and a phylctaenia cornata were back again as well as a pair (this time) of another micro moth, agapeta hamana.

The other two moths in last night were large moths I haven’t yet ID’d, though I think these are both new ones or at least moths making their first appearance this year. And they both appear already to have been in the wars. Unfortunately neither is captured terribly well so I’ve rather handicapped myself in terms of sorting out what they are. At the moment I think the first a Wainscot and the second possibly the Dingy Shears. I have a rather hectic weekend ahead so may not get these nailed until early next week when I have a bit of what passes as ‘down time’.

Wainscot?

Wainscot?

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Last night was quieter, but the bathroom moth trap has been setting an unanticipated and unprecedented standard in terms of both quantity and quality over most of the past week.

I’ve posted on the ones that I photographed and don’t expect to ID as well as those I’m hesitant about in the two preceding posts. This last catch up post features the moths I’ve been able to ID. Some have established themselves as regular visitors this year, others are returns from previous years. Happily though the list of visitors has now significantly expanded with some new species and new variants. Here they are:

Carcina quercana

Carcina quercana

This is a lovely moth from the family Oecophoridae which are as a group among the most colourful of those classed as micro moths. About half the world’s species are found in Australia; this one is normally on the wing in July and August and typically frequents woodland though I’ve seen it before in the strawberry patch. This one was in the bathroom a couple of nights ago and stayed until the previous evening but is now gone.

 The Least Carpet  (idaea rusticata atrosignaria) isn’t scarce but is found predominantly in the south-east of England from here around to Dorset and on the wing from June to August. The larvae feed on Ivy and Traveller’s Joy. This is the first I’ve seen and noted in the bathroom, it is prettier than the more common Garden Carpet.

Least Carpet (idaea rusticata atrosignaria)

Least Carpet (idaea rusticata atrosignaria)

Phylctaenia coronata is a regular visitor. It is associated with Elder both as a moth and in its larval form. It is on the wing through June and July.

Phylctaenia coronata

Phylctaenia coronata

The Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata) is one of the most eye catching moths to turn up in the bathroom; big and bright and distinctive. This is the first one I’ve seen in the bathroom. It is a common moth and will be on the wing through now until August. It isn’t particular in terms of plants. It has a wingspan in the order of 50mm but isn’t as heavy bodied as some, so it wasn’t such an overpowering presence, and quite lovely to look at when at rest. This particular one stayed overnight and until the following evening.  

Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata)

Magpie Moth (abraxas grossulariata)

The Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata) has been in any number of times this year; it has a shorter season, being on the wing in June and July. It is specifically associated with Common Nettle.

Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata)

Small Magpie (eurrhypara hortulata)

The Orange Moth (angerona prunaria) has been to the Bathroom light in previous years – it is the moth in the header photograph.  But it has two quite different forms. The one I used in the header is orange with a bit of brown bordering and light flecking across the wings. The moth that came into the bathroom was huge – certainly at least the 50mm guideline.

Orange Moth (angerona prunaria)

Orange Moth (angerona prunaria)

The Bee Moth (aphomia sociella) is a new one this year and made a second appearance. It is a threat to honeycomb and therefore not entirely to be welcomed. It is on the wing between June and August.

Bee Moth (aphomia sociella)

Bee Moth (aphomia sociella)

The Common Emerald (hemithea aestivaria) has been in the bathroom in past years but this year is appearing in far greater numbers. It also seems to be appearing in two forms: one deep emerald the other very washed out. They are in effect the same size and in no way resemble any of the other ‘emerald’ moths.

Udea olivalis

Udea olivalis

Udea olivalis is a common moth and on the wing in June and July. It has been in the house before this year, and I’ve spotted it in previous years. It is a pyralid, therefore a micro moth, found through out Britain and in its larval form dines on a variety of plants.

Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhomboidaria)

Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhomboidaria)

The Willow Beauty (peribatodes rhombaoidaria), on the wing between June and October though in two generations, is common and widespread. Like a lot of the moths that come to the bathroom the food plants include Ivy.

 And also…

Of course last night there would be more small moths I’m unsure of. The larger moth on the left in this photo is a Small Dusty Wave. The point of the pic. is the smaller moth on the right – I took several pictures but this is the one that shows its markings most clearly.

Small Dusty Wave and unidentified micro moth

Small Dusty Wave and unidentified micro moth

And then there was this moth. Its highly reflective scales meant I could not get a particularly good picture of it. For what it is worth:

Unidentified micro moth

Unidentified micro moth

And with that I have caught up on the moth trap and it remains only to sift through the photographs taken on my walk this afternoon.

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